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A hot Arctic may give very cold winters

An increasing number of research reports point at that the recent cold long winters in northern Europe are connected to the melting of the Arctic ice in summertime, reports local swedish newspaper Sydsvenskan. Frans-Jan Parmentier, researcher at the Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science at Lund University has done the study.

As the ice areas become smaller, the temperature differences become smaller between the Arctic and Central Europe, as ice surface reflects 80 percent of solar radiation, and open oceans absorbs instead 90 percent of the radiation. The effects is most perceptible in winter time.

- One hypothesis is that the jet streams weaken and makes it easier for cold air to flow down from the Arctic, says Frans-Jan Parmentier.

Really cold winters have occurred even before the Arctic began to melt significantly, he points out. And the unpredictability of the weather makes that it is still difficult to scientifically see a clear relationship.

- More research and more winters to study will give the answer.

 

 

 

 

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